Outside the Backdoor

Observing what can happen in your own garden even in suburbia!


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Yuccas and me

I have been the owner of a yucca plant since my 21st birthday!  A pouring wet day just before my Finals at university and I remember everyone scuttling in and out of my room to wish me a happy birthday and then scuttling back off into the rain to revise.  One friend knocked on the door and, when I opened it, I could barely see her as she was holding a not inconsiderable plant – a yucca!

As you can imagine, the label was lost many years ago so I have no idea what sort of yucca other than it’s the one you still seem to be able to buy as a house plant should you feel so inclined.  However, I would urge caution before popping one into your trolley on the next visit to the garden centre or DIY store.

For the first eight or nine years of my yucca’s life it happily sat in its pot in my bedroom.  I think I potted it on once or twice to give it some new compost.  However, when we moved into our first house, we placed it in the dining room adjacent to the patio doors.  It absolutely loved it there!  Spurred on by all the light, it grew and it grew … and it grew!  The most common question we were asked was, “What are you going to do when it hits the ceiling?”  We were spared this decision for a little longer as, in the course of moving and being squashed into the front well of a Peugeot 205, it had developed a kink in its trunk which delayed the ceiling problem for a little while.

Eventually we had to take the plunge and, having consulted a number of books (bearing in mind this was the days before the internet was ubiquitous!), we chopped it in half!  I can assure you that it took a huge amount of courage to do the deed and, if I remember rightly, the chosen tool was the bread knife as the trunk was too wide for anything as normal as secateurs.  Following the instructions, we doused the newly cut base in hormone rooting powder, plunged it into compost and waited.  We need not have feared, soon the top looked remarkably happy and was clearly getting taller.  Meanwhile, to our amazement, the bottom began to shoot in two places and soon we had a double headed yucca!

Of course, this only solved the problem for a year or two and soon the original plant and its offspring were also getting rather tall and so we repeated the process all over again.  By the time we moved into our current house in 2000, we had no less than five yucca plants!  My sister-in-law once commented that, if we didn’t have the plants, we would have had room for a three-piece band in the corner of the dining room!

Eventually sense prevailed and we reduced our yucca numbers down to two.  I can’t remember what happened to them all but at least one ended up a work and graced the university’s main reception for some years.

Our remaining yuccas continued to grow and, guess what?  We built an extension with a high ceiling!  It was a really good way of avoiding the problem again!  In fact that summer, during the building works, we were amazed that the plants survived so well outside.  As the build timescale extended, we were eventually chivvying the builders to get a move on so that we could get the plants into the warm before winter began.

In 2015, it would be fair to say we hit a crisis – two yucca plants almost at ceiling height … again!  So, it was out with the bread knife and rooting powder once more.  We decided not to do both plants at once.  Despite having done this process many times, we still lack confidence that we are going to be successful and only on that first occasion has the base of the old plant continued to flourish.  I also didn’t fancy being left without any tall, structural plants in the lounge as they do look good in the high-ceilinged room.

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Demonstrating height!

With our 2015 cutting now reaching a sensible height, this spring we had to do the inevitable and tackle the remaining tall plant.  We left it later than usual.  Not until the 29th May did we summon up the courage to man-handle it out of the backdoor and onto the patio for surgery!

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Our latest yucca offspring!

it is only now, four months on and with two or three brand new leaves emerging from the middle, do I feel we can say that we have another successful cutting and that the tradition of us owning a yucca plant looks set to continue for many years to come.  I have now lost count but I think this cutting is now the fourth generation, making it the great-grandchild of the original!

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Definitely NOT outside the back door!

Over the past couple of weekends I have made a fascinating study of front gardens.  This isn’t a new passion of mine and I’m not about to re-title this blog anytime soon.  I have been leafleting and, I will put my hand up now, to admit that I am about to make a shameless plug for a amateur show that I’m involved with – Hounslow Light Opera’s ‘Little Shop of Horrors‘ (tickets still available – and there is a horticultural connection!!)

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We do many things to promote a show and door-to-door leafleting is one of them.  I’ll readily admit that it’s not my favourite task but it does provide a fascinating opportunity to see what other people living locally have done with their front gardens.

May be it’s just a South-West London thing but to me front gardens are definitely the poor relation.  How often has anyone said to you that you must come round as their front garden is looking stunning at the moment?  Living where we do, front gardens are either for car parking or skip parking as yet another house extends up, sideways or even down!

I will confess that local front gardens have sprung a few surprises on me recently.  For example, I have been surprised at the prevalence of plastic trees … yes, really!  Plastic box in tubs and hanging plastic box balls, which have a tendency to fade to blue, seemed surprisingly popular in one local street.  (Hampton friends reading this, it’s OK, it’s not you!)

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Another striking thing has been the multitude of different hues of gravel, from the humble grey beach pebble through to the designer purple slate chips.  I confess I quite liked the slate grey and white gravel in front the house with a matching slate grey door with white surrounds.  We have gravel in our front garden but it’s a fairly boring shade of brown (or gold as the packet claims).  Another neighbour recently gravelled her front garden as a quick option (they intend to extend in a few years and so don’t want to create a lovely garden and then plonk scaffolding in it) but she’s quickly discovered one big disadvantage – the foxes absolutely love playing in it at night!

Our own front garden has had a rather chequered history.  When we moved here, it was dominated by a monkey puzzle tree which was certainly a talking point.  Then all of a sudden, twelve years ago now, it died.  It was incredibly sad to see this and the speed with which it happened was truly shocking.  This picture shows it at the start of 2005 when it was still vividly green.

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But by the end of 2005, the branches were brown and crisp from top to toe and even more vicious than when it had been alive!  (Although they did look great in the frost and covered in cobwebs.

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Once the tree had been taken down, we really didn’t know what to do to fill the gap.  Pots, including one with a eucalyptus that became far too big, filled the space and continue to do so today.

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We never knew why the monkey puzzle died and that has always deterred us from committing again to something distinctive in the front garden.  So enjoy our spring hellebores, our potted hollies by the door and the blast of golden forsythia in the front and middle hedge every spring but, beyond that I realise we are just like everyone else and most of our focus is outside the back door!

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Still, I’m not going to complain.  At least these plants don’t demand blood!