Outside the Backdoor

Observing what can happen in your own garden even in suburbia!

Relishing the roses

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Back in March I wrote that you can never have too many roses! Some friends literally took me at my word and on our Silver Wedding anniversary we received not one, but two Silver Anniversary roses! I’m pleased to report that they are doing well and we’ve had our first bloom.

It was the emergence of this first bud that prompted me into thinking that it was time to do a quick round up of how our roses have been doing so far this Spring / early Summer. For those of you who normally read these blog posts in our church magazine, you’ll realise why this one won’t make it to print there – black and white would be such a waste!

Ahead of the game we started the rose season with the first bud of Rosa Mutabilis, the China rose. This amazing plant produces these beautiful, open yellow / flushed pink flowers which gradually darken to a deep cerise. The openness of the flowers means that they are attractive to wildlife, they smell beautiful and the bush will continue to flower well into the autumn. Described like that, it really is the perfect plant!

So perfect that John decided that we would have the yellow variety as well. Sadly this doesn’t have the same scent. However, it looks like being a do-er again as, whilst newly planted this year, it has leapt into flower!

Another do-er is our Shropshire Lad. Bought in memory of my father, who was a Shropshire Lad, it started life in my mother’s garden and I still remember the day when, with a friend’s help, I wrestled it from the ground to bring it here. That was the day that I learnt just how long a tap-root a rose can have! Despite all our careful planning, digging a broad circle around the plant and following all the advice you see on television, we ended up pulling and cursing and eventually cutting some roots. Thankfully it didn’t hold it back and it soon settled in and rewards us with blooms for most of the summer

Shropshire Lad has been causing a bit of debate on another garden blog so I hope this picture will add evidence to Ali, the Mindful Gardener‘s, conclusion that she doesn’t own a Shropshire Lad!

Which just goes to show how difficult it is to identify a rose if you don’t know what it is. Here’s a good example. This next rose had a difficult start in life. Planted in a pot on my mother’s patio, she hadn’t bargained for the builders next door dropping cement all over it! Fortunately roses are tough at heart and since moving it here it has gradually found its feet but sadly I don’t know what it is. I am open to suggestions!

Last year when planning our new hot border, we decided that a rose would be a good addition as it would add longer flowering interest than many of the perennials often associated with hot border planting such as dahlias. I spent a long time looking at different yellow and orange roses before finally settling on Togmeister. I didn’t twig immediately that it was named after Terry Wogan but, with its irrepressible flow of golden blooms, it is perhaps aptly named.

Last year Togmeister flowered and flowered and is giving every indication of doing exactly that again this year. In a way this is good as the blooms don’t actually last very long. The rosebuds are a perfect shape and deep buttery yellow but, once fully open, the flowers fade quite quickly to pale yellow and then fall. It also has a delicious scent, slightly on the lemony side, what you might call a very ‘clean’ smelling rose rather than dense and cloying.

Finally I just want to mention our climbing Iceberg. John had trained this so beautifully on the pergola this year, carefully pruning to encourage upward flowering shoots only to discover that this meant that the buds were perfectly placed for marauding squirrels to devour! Courtesy of the cats we are now one squirrel less but there’s still at least three around which has prompted us to deploy hot chilli powder to the tops of the pergola in the hopes that it really is a deterrent! Meanwhile, we were thrilled this week to see that a small cluster of blooms had defied the cheeky wildlife and was managing to flower. What a sight this rose would have been if all the flowers had been able to bloom ….

Photography – Credit this time around to John Malone for the pictures of ‘Silver Anniversary” and ‘Shropshire Lad’. The rest are down to the author!

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One thought on “Relishing the roses

  1. Yes, conclusive proof. I’ve also seen my mum’s now, and they are different. Both beautiful, as are your other roses. I agree, you can’t have too many roses.

    Liked by 1 person

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