Outside the Backdoor

Observing what can happen in your own garden even in suburbia!


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The power of ponds

Water is an essential feature of any wildlife garden and for most of us that means a pond. If you are looking to make your garden, terrace or even balcony, more environmentally friendly, you can’t go far wrong in adding a splash of water.

Our pond in spring time (c) Elizabeth Malone

When we moved here twenty years ago, there was a willow tree by the pergola. The pergola had been carefully positioned by the previous owners so that it caught the evening sun in the summer and was therefore a lovely place to wind down at the end of the day with a glass of something cold in your hand. Sitting in the pergola and by the willow tree, we quickly realised that this area was begging for a pond. It is perhaps ironic that the willow tree subsequently died but we have never regretted the decision to build the pond.

Pond and pergola (c) John Malone

Before embarking on the pond we had tested the water (apologies for the terrible pun!) by plugging the drainage hole in a large ceramic pot, filling it with water and adding a water lily. It actually worked really well and was a delight to look at. I’d really recommend this for anyone who either doesn’t have the space for a pond or who just wants to add a bit more water to their garden.

Our increasingly giant water lily! (C) John Malone

Without a shadow of doubt, our pond is teeming with wildlife. As I write this, it is a glorious sunny spring day and red damselflies are emerging, skimming the water, perching on marigold leaves and quickly finding a mate. I’ve also counted six newts. On a day like this they love to just float in the sunshine. Sadly we didn’t have any frogspawn this year. We did have a lonely frog who turned up and waited patiently for its mate but clearly to no avail. We are really missing the tadpoles as they devour the green weed in the pond and keep the water clear. Instead I am having to mess around, trying to extract it with a hoe or any other device that seems to work. I’ve tried scooping with a net but trying to clean out the net before making the next scoop, is really frustrating! There are also water snails – where did they come from? Everyone always says build a pond and the wildlife will come. This is so true.

Tadpoles last spring (c) Elizabeth Malone

Creating a pond needn’t be complicated but a little extra thought will help develop a really good wildlife haven. For example, ensuring that there are plants with tall, strappy leaves enables damselflies and dragonflies to emerge from the water and dry off after shedding their skin. You need plants that will maintain oxygen levels to enable frogs and newts to survive. You should also always include a way out for any creature that accidentally falls in. Most people have hedgehogs in mind when they say this but your cat might appreciate it too! Fortunately we have only ended up with a soggy moggy on about three occasions!

Dragonfly emerging (c) John Malone

As well as being a wildlife home, the pond also helps to sustain a variety of other creatures. The birds love to bathe here as well as drink and we frequently see bees and wasps refreshing themselves. The heron, however, is one of our less welcome visitors as it is probably the reason why we don’t have frogspawn. From our observations, there is nothing better that a heron likes for breakfast than a nice juicy frog! A bit like foxes, I think we have a bit of a love-hate relationship with the heron. They are so intriguing to watch. The first time I saw one standing by our pond early one morning, my first thought was that someone was playing a joke on me and had stuck a plastic one in the garden … but then it moved its head slightly!

Bee taking advantage of the marsh marigolds (c) John Malone

As we originally envisaged, sitting next to the pond is a really restful experience, watching the wildlife and listening the trickling water (on the occasions when we do remember to turn on the fountain!) and I would recommend to anyone adding a pond to your garden to enhance the environment, not just for the wildlife, but for you as well.

The relaxing sound of trickling water (c) Elizabeth Malone


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From sludge to sublime

One of the most significant things we’ve added to our garden in the eighteen years we have been here is the pond.  It is very much a wildlife pond so no fish for us!  Almost from day one we have been fascinated by the variety of species it sustains, from the bright flashes of blue and red damselflies to the more dramatic emergence of large dragonflies who leave their outer skins on the iris leaves as they prepare to take flight.

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1st damselfly of 2018 sunning itself on the pergola by the pond (c) Elizabeth Malone

Then there are the dozens of pond skaters who dart around from spring to autumn, the waterboatmen doing backstroke across the length and the snails, lots of snails – wherever did they all come from?  Of course there are frogs too and their tadpoles, and a colony of newts who hang suspended in the shadow of water lily pads.

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Just hanging around!  (c) Elizabeth Malone

In terms of planting, the pond is almost entirely ringed by marsh marigolds which I remember us first falling in love with in Iceland where they grow wild and in abundance alongside rivers and streams.  Their deep golden yellow always looks stunning when the water surrounding them reflects a vivid blue sky.  We also have iris and the water forget-me-not is extremely happy, as is the purple flowered pickerel which is really getting rather too big for its boots.  All of these plants are very welcome as they are also incredibly popular with bees and hoverflies who appear to enjoy being by the water as much as we do on a hot summer’s day.

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Marsh marigolds (c) John Malone

What is far less welcome is the pond weed, in particular the blanket weed which, for some reason this spring, has decided to launch a takeover of our pond.  It began with the frogspawn.  Whilst that may seem a very odd statement, I love frogspawn when it is newly laid or when you can see tiny tadpoles wriggling within the jelly cell, but I don’t like it as the tadpoles break out of it leaving a rather slimy gunge all over the surface of the pond.  This gunge appears to attract the blanket weed.   We normally use barley straw to combat blanket weed but perhaps we were too slow in getting it into the water this year?  Or perhaps the weed was encouraged when the temperatures suddenly leapt from freezing to sweltering within a week back in April, but either way we were faced with unattractive pond soup.

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Blanket weed – yuk!  (c) Elizabeth Malone

Fortunately I found a bundle of barley straw in the back of the shed cupboard but we realised that it stood no chance without a little help from us.  But which utensil to use?  I tried the winding the weed around the stick approach but I think I would have been there all summer.  John decided on the garden rake which worked reasonably well but was still slow progress.  In the end he decided that there was nothing for it but to put on the pond gauntlets and plunge in up to elbow depth.  Soon he had three piles of green, gungy weed around the pond, each having carefully been checked first for any inhabitants but also left overnight so that any shy creatures could creep out of their own accord.  Although the pond looked horribly murky for an hour or so, it was surprisingly how quickly it cleared and it was great to be able to get a clear view of our newt colony swimming around.  They didn’t seem too disappointed that some of their weed/food had been removed, in fact they almost seemed to appreciate being able to swim more freely.

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Gungy weed drying off! (c) Elizabeth Malone

As part of his delving into the deep, John also retried the pond pump and soon had a delightful trickle of water cascading little diamonds of water.  Apparently moving water helps the barley straw to be active but it was also rather lovely on a really hot day just to sit and watch the water spilling over and reflecting the blue sky above.  Time to just sit and stare.

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Time to relax!  (c) Elizabeth Malone